God Knows Where You are

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pharmacy

I Test My Brain to be sure it’s still fine — Atueyi, 80-Year-Old Pharmacist
Pharm.(Sir) Ifeanyi Atueyi

Sometimes, especially when we are passing through difficult times, the tendency is to ask, “God, where are you? Are you aware of my challenges and difficulties?”  The assurance is that God knows your present situation and the reason for it.

When Joseph was thrown into the prison, it was definitely not easy for him to imagine   the fulfilment of God’s plan for his life. But he had his prosperous future in mind. He never lost hope. Romans 8:28 (NKJV) says, “And we know that all things work together for good to those who love God, to those who are the called according to His purpose.” He knew God was still working out his destiny.

Your current job may not be giving you satisfaction. You may not even be in the good books of your boss and your conditions of service are not   conducive. You are bound to be asking yourself some pertinent questions about your future. You may even sometimes blame yourself for even accepting the job offer.

My friend, this is the time to take your matter to God, as your Father, who has already determined the good plans He has for you. Jeremiah 29:11 (NKJV) says, “For I know the thoughts that I think toward you, says the LORD, thoughts of peace and not of evil, to give you a future and a hope.”

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Setting Right Priorities

Your current job may be a preparation for what God has planned that you should do for Him. A time will come when you will look back to realise how God has directed your steps in your career path. Psalm 37:23 assures, “The steps of a good man are ordered by the LORD, and He delights in his way.” I know that God directs   the steps of His people as He prepares them for the planned life.

In preparing you for the future, God takes you through pleasant and unpleasant experiences. I recollect how I found myself in hospital pharmacy practice which I didn’t like. By the time I graduated with B.Pharm in 1967, the Nigeria-Biafra hostilities, which resulted in full-blown war, had broken out.  I joined the government service which I didn’t enjoy. I found myself in hospital practice. However, I tried to do my work, since there was no alternative.

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Leaving a legacy

But the situation became more nauseating when I was posted to the Biafran Army, as the officer in charge of the hospital in Abiriba, in the present Abia State. I so detested the work that each time casualties were brought to the hospital I disappeared from the pharmacy because I could not stand the sight of blood from wounded soldiers.

Even as at today, I still feel like fainting when I expose myself to such situations. I admired the medical doctors and   students treating the wounded soldiers but I did not envy them at all.

Even after the war in January, 1970, I did not know the direction I was going. I tried retail pharmacy, production pharmacy and sales and marketing but did not find joy in any of them. However, wherever I found myself I tried to put in my best. Ecclesiastes 9:10 NKJV says, “Whatever your hand finds to do, do it with  you might, for there is no work or device or knowledge or wisdom in the grave where you are going”.

God allowed me to drift from one employment to the other in order to fulfil His purpose for my life. Of course, in each employment, I met people of different character. I worked with honest and dishonest people. I worked with hardworking and lazy individuals. I worked with wicked and kind bosses. On looking back, I give glory to God for those exposures, which helped me to become the person I am today.

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Tapping the resources of your mind

All along, the question I was asking God was, where was I going? This is a question which no human being can correctly answer, unless revealed by God.  Children of God have the privilege of receiving God’s leading   and guidance. Isaiah 30:21 says, “Your ears shall hear a word behind you, “This is the way, walk in it,” whenever you turn to the right hand or you turn to the left.”

It was only when God directed my steps   to pharmaceutical journalism towards the end of 1978 that I started appreciating why He took me through various jobs, experiences and services to people. Providentially, it was my free service as editor-in-chief of the PSN journal from 1974 to 1978 that turned out to be the nucleus of my calling or vocation.

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